Books, Art, & Visual Culture

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Writing and design by Melissa Hill, graphic designer.

Posts tagged YA
The Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry

This series tackles some heavy topics, big questions about how our memories shape us, the value in experiencing pain and the worth of a peaceful society if no one is free to live a genuine human experience. This aspect of it reminded me of A Clockwork Orange — how much value can you place on ‘good behaviour’ that isn’t chosen through free will?

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling & Jack Thorne

I read the other day that next year is the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter. Do you know how old this makes me feel? I have colleagues who hold JK Rowling as dear in their childhood memories as I do Enid Blyton. The Harry Potter books are the tales of their childhood. And I clearly remember reading them as an adult.

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Day Boy by Trent Jamieson

At the centre of Day Boy is Midfield, the kind of small town that I’ve passed through, but never lived in. I’ve never grown up in a place, feeling it to be home because it’s all I’m familiar with, the landscape of all my childhood memories, feeling its edges press against me as I grow too large for it, like an ill-fitting garment.

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The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

Anyway, I digress. The 5th Wave is a burger. I read it, I enjoyed it for what it was, and haven’t thought about it since. Until now, obviously, but it is fairly difficult to review a book without thinking about it. I’m not saying that The 5th Wave is a bad book. It was entertaining enough to keep me reading and provided that sense of escapism, like many action films that we consume for mindless diversion without them making any further impact on our lives.

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The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon

I’m not much of a fantasy reader. Well, I say that, but I adore Isobelle Carmody’s work, which I suppose is predominantly fantasy. But to me, that is simply a testament to the strength of her world-building and her amazing ability to make you forget that the things you’re reading about couldn’t possibly happen. However, I digress. This isn’t actually a post about Isobelle Carmody.

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